何毓琦的个人博客分享 http://blog.sciencenet.cn/u/何毓琦 哈佛(1961-2001) 清华(2001-date)

博文

The Family Automobile Trip and vacation in the US 精选

已有 5148 次阅读 2008-1-31 21:31 |个人分类:生活点滴|系统分类:海外观察

(For new reader and those who request 好友请求, please read my 公告栏 first).

 Family travels in the US with the exception of airplane are almost


 exclusively by automobiles, particularly for vacation or tourist activities.


 In fact the American Automobile Association publishes yearly statistic of


 the travel cost for a family of four per day by car to help people estimate


 their vacation cost. In one of my earlier blog articles, I wrote about the


 joy of travel by automobile on the US Interstate highways. Appearing


 below is an article I wrote for my own gratification some years ago about


 auto travel and the family vacation home. (For reader’s clarification: 


Sophia is the name of my wife of 48 years. Adrian, Christine and Lara are 


the names of our children born in 1961, 1963, and 1973)





Route 28, New Hampshire





Route 28 is a black top two lane highway. Before the days of Interstate 93,


 it used to be the road linking Massachusetts with southern and mid New


 Hampshire. Once pass the Mass border and the first NH town of


 Hooksett, it winds its way mostly through country side dotted with small


 lakes, farms, occasional trailer parks until it reaches the first big town  (by


 NH standards), Wolfeboro , where it joins the other main NH highway


 Route 16 to northern NH.





Wolfeboro, N.H. situated on the southeastern tip of Lake Winnepesaki


 proclaims itself as “the first summer resort of America”. It is a tourist


 town for which progress and time have passed by. There are no shopping


 mall with Gap or Banana Republic stores, no McDonald or KFC, no


 Marriot or Hyatt, no haute cuisine restaurants, and no megaplex movie 


theaters (in fact no movie theater period). Instead it has quaint book stores,


 updated Five and Ten, diners and American style family restaurants, old


 fashion resort inns, beautiful lakes and mountains. A tourist from the


 1950’s will feel very much at home here in the 21st century. 





40 years ago, during a family vacation we stumbled upon the  “Hidden


 Valley” vacation development just north of Wolfeboro on the shores of


 Lower Beech Pond, a glacier lake about 2.5 square miles in area  over 50


 feet in depth and at an elevation of 900 feet . The development was run by


 a small time real estate person from Massachusetts who did not have


 grandiose plans and was trying to turn a quick profit during the first phase


 of vacation property ownership in the mid to late sixties. He bought the


 southern shore of the lower Beech Pond and the land behind the


 waterfront. When we saw it he had three or four waterfront houses plus a


 couple of non-waterfront cottages built. In 1967, through ignorance and


 pure luck, I made a quick killing in the warrants of National General, 


Inc.stock. The profit of $6000.00 became the down payment on a 


waterfront lot in Hidden Valley. A good friend and architect, Paul Sun, 


designed a plan for a compact contemporary vacation home. The 


developer built the foundation and the shell of the house  Over the winter 


of 1967 and the Spring of 1968, we finished the inside of the house 


ourselves during many weekends. It was quite an experience and we 


acquired most of our


 carpentry, wiring, and plumbing knowledge during that period. In fact we


 were the fore-runner of today’s men/women team of do-it-yourselfers on


 many cable TV stations. We slept in saw dust, cooked on a hot plate and


 played endless 50’s music on our tape recorder. Adrian and Christine


 were respectively five and four years old. I don’t remember how they


 spent their time while we worked. What I do remember are that they were


 super kids no bother at all while we worked. Adrian broke through the


 spring ice on the Lake once while playing with Christine. He managed to


 climb back on shore and was afraid to tell us what happened. Thinking


 back, it was a miracle that he survived. 





In forty plus years, the development has grown to some 40 houses


 with a few year long residents. The opposite shore of the lake remained


 undeveloped in local ownership. Thus our summer retreat remained a


 retreat in every sense of the word. In fact, for the first 18 years we did not


 have telephone. In the mid eighties, we enlarged the original design of the


 house (again with the help of Paul Sun). The house can now


 accommodate three generations of the family at one time. I still try not to


 read e-mails when there.





However, I am digressing. The point is that to get to our vacation home


 from Lexington, we must travel on Rt. 28 for at least 60% of the time.


 Over the years since 1967, our family has traveled this route year in year


 out countless times - for opening and closing the house, for winter skiing,


 summer weekends, fall foliage, and for going there within two weeks


 after Lara was born. The trip takes a little over two hours one way. One


 learns about every curve and peculiarity of the route. There are the


 cemetery where all children will hold their breadth until we passed it, the


 roadside ice cream place where we used to stop as reward for good


 behavior of the children during travel, the various shortcuts we discovered


 over the years, the farm stand where we buy fresh corns, the bakery where


 they sell day old goods at discount, the location of various A to Z signs


 which children used to play the game of the same name, and on and on. 


 All of these are part of the memory bank and fabric of the family that was


 built over a period of 40 years. 


Unlike daily commuting to work during which one travels alone, is on


 auto-pilot or thinking out thoughts. This trip invariably is done family


 style. You are confined in a small space and can't help but share your


 thoughts with other family members.


But above all, it was during these trips that a great deal of family


 education and value system were passed from one generation to the other.


 And now as children have grown and left, many trips consisted just of


 two persons, my wife and I. During these two hours, we share our most


 intimate thoughts, feelings, and aspirations enhanced by decades of living


 together. 





Contrast living at home and commuting to work with living at the vacation


 home and travelling on Rt. 28. The former a necessary part of your


 existence which you tend to take for granted; the latter, although repeated


 often, is always an anticipated event with special memories. Going there


 you have anticipation of good times, and coming back, you savor the


 same perhaps with a tinge of regret that it is over too soon. One can’t help


 but be reminded of some aspects of the movie "On Golden Pond".





I remember the time Sophia and I constructed a dock on the beach. But


 then it turned out to be too heavy to lift it into the water. When we finally


 managed the feat we both sat down in the water and laughed crazy like


 six year old kids with pure happiness. And the time one sultry summer


 evening arriving late at night at the lake, the whole family went skinny


 dipping at midnight. Or the time Grandma flip head over heel into the


 water by wearing a inner tube too low around her thigh and had to be


 rescued. I can go on and on. . . .





Now the grandchildren have made staying at NH an annual summer event.


 They are doing the same thing their parents did over a generation ago. I


 hope the second generation can also take time to record their feelings and


 pass their life experience and education to the third about this route and


 this summer house. It will be our version of immortality.




http://blog.sciencenet.cn/blog-1565-15214.html

上一篇:From Today’s Washington Post
下一篇:Understanding contemporary China
收藏 分享 举报

0

该博文允许注册用户评论 请点击登录 评论 (0 个评论)

数据加载中...

Archiver|手机版|科学网 ( 京ICP备14006957 )

GMT+8, 2017-9-24 02:21

Powered by ScienceNet.cn

Copyright © 2007-2017 中国科学报社

返回顶部