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SEL第2期文章目录及全文下载

已有 627 次阅读 2019-9-16 15:13 |个人分类:SEL进展|系统分类:论文交流

REVIEWS

Soil biofilms: microbial interactions, challenges, and advanced techniques for ex-situ characterization  

                                                     

DOI: 10.1007/s42832-019-0017-7

Peng Cai, Xiaojie Sun, Yichao Wu, Chunhui Gao, Monika Mortimer, Patricia A. Holden, Marc Redmile-Gordon, Qiaoyun Huang

Abstract: Soil is inhabited by a myriad of microorganisms, many of which can form supracellular structures, called biofilms, comprised of surface-associated microbial cells embedded in hydrated extracellular polymeric substance that facilitates adhesion and survival. Biofilms enable intensive inter- and intra-species interactions that can increase the degradation efficiency of soil organic matter and materials commonly regarded as toxins. Here, we first discuss organization, dynamics and properties of soil biofilms in the context of traditional approaches to probe the soil microbiome. Social interactions among bacteria, such as cooperation and competition, are discussed. We also summarize different biofilm cultivation devices in combination with optics and fluorescence microscopes as well as sequencing techniques for the study of soil biofilms. Microfluidic platforms, which can be applied to mimic the complex soil environment and study microbial behaviors at the microscale with high-throughput screening and novel measurements, are also highlighted. This review aims to highlight soil biofilm research in order to expand the current limited knowledge about soil microbiomes which until now has mostly ignored biofilms as a dominant growth form. 

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Cite this article: Peng Cai, Xiaojie Sun, Yichao Wu, Chunhui Gao, Monika Mortimer, Patricia A. Holden, Marc Redmile-Gordon, Qiaoyun Huang.                   Soil biofilms: microbial interactions, challenges, and advanced techniques for ex-situ characterization[J]. Soil Ecology Letters, 2019, 1(3-4): 85 -93 


Arbuscular mycorrhiza and plant chromium tolerance                                                        

DOI: 10.1007/s42832-019-0015-9

Songlin Wu, Xin Zhang, Longbin Huang, Baodong Chen

Abstract: Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ubiquitous soil fungi that readily form symbiotic associations with most terrestrial plants. The growth and functions of AM fungi depend on carbohydrates supplied by the plants, in return, they assist the plants acquire mineral nutrients (e.g., phosphorus) from soil. The AM symbiosis also improves plant survival in various environments of unfavorable growth conditions, such as metal (loid) contaminated soil. It has been well demonstrated that AM symbiosis improved plant adaptation to Cr contaminated soil, which would have a great potential in phytoremediation and ecological restoration of Cr contaminated soils. By using Cr as an example case, we have reviewed the role of AM fungi in alleviation of Cr phytotoxicity and associated factors influencing AM plant Cr tolerance. AM symbiosis improves plant Cr tolerance through its direct roles in Cr stabilization and transformation and indirect roles via AM symbiosis mediated nutrient acquisition and physiological regulation. Future research perspectives on physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying Cr behavior and detoxification in AM symbiosis, as well as potential usage of AM fungi in ecological restoration and agriculture production in Cr contaminated soils were also proposed.

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Cite this article: Songlin Wu, Xin Zhang, Longbin Huang, Baodong Chen.                   Arbuscular mycorrhiza and plant chromium tolerance[J]. Soil Ecology Letters, 2019, 1(3-4): 94 -104 

RESEARCH ARTICLES

Dynamic changes in soil chemical properties and microbial community structure in response to different nitrogen fertilizers in an acidified celery soil

                                                      

DOI: 10.1007/s42832-019-0012-z

Yuping Wu, Jiangxing Wu, Yongjun Ma, Ying Lian, Hui Sun, Danchao Xie, Yaying Li, Philip C. Brookes, Huaiying Yao

Abstract: To determine the effects of different kinds of nitrogen fertilizer, especially high-efficiency slow-release fertilizers, on soil pH, nitrogen (N) and microbial community structures in an acidic celery soil, four treatments (CK, no N fertilizer; NR, urea; PE, calcium cyanamide fertilizer; and SK, controlled-release N fertilizer) were applied, and soil pH, total soil N, inorganic N, and soil microbial biomass C were analyzed. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were extracted and detected using the MIDI Sherlock microbial identification system. The PE treatment significantly improved soil pH, from 4.80 to>6.00, during the whole growth period of the celery, and resulted in the highest celery yield among the four treatments. After 14 d application of calcium cyanamide, the soil nitrate content significantly decreased, but the ammonium content significantly increased. The PE treatment also significantly increased soil microbial biomass C during the whole celery growth period. Canonical variate analysis of the PLFA data indicated that the soil microbial community structure in the CK treatment was significantly different from those in the N applied treatments after 49 d fertilization. However, there was a significant difference (P<0.05) in soil microbial community structure between the PE treatment and the other three treatments at the end of the experiment. Calcium cyanamide is a good choice for farmers to use on acidic celery land because it supplies sufficient N, and increases soil pH, microbial biomass and the yield of celery.

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Cite this article: Yuping Wu, Jiangxing Wu, Yongjun Ma, Ying Lian, Hui Sun, Danchao Xie, Yaying Li, Philip C. Brookes, Huaiying Yao.  Dynamic changes in soil chemical properties and microbial community structure in response to different nitrogen fertilizers in an acidified celery soil[J]. Soil Ecology Letters, 2019, 1(3-4): 105 -113 


Redox-driven shifts in soil microbial community structure in the drawdown zone after construction of the Three Gorges Dam

                                                      

DOI: 10.1007/s42832-019-0005-y

Shuling Wang, Sarwee J. Faeflen, Alan L. Wright, Xia Zhu-Barker, Xianjun Jiang

Abstract: Soil redox is a critical environmental factor shaping the microbial community structure and ultimately alters the nutrient cycling. However, the response of soil microbial community structure to prolonged or repeated redox fluctuations is not yet clear. To study the dynamic effects of prolonged redox disturbances to the soil microbial community structure, soil samples experiencing 8, 5 and 0 alternating oxic-anoxic cycles within approximately 6 months each year were collected and the microbial community structure were evaluated using phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA) profiles. Prolonged redox disturbances had significant effects on soil physiochemical properties and soil microbial community structure. The relative abundance of straight chain saturated PLFAs, cyclopropyl, and terminal- and mid-branched chain saturated PLFAs increased due to prolonged redox disturbances, but there was a consistent decrease in linear monounsaturated PLFAs and polyunsaturated PLFAs in the fluctuating zone. Prolonged redox disturbances had a negative impact on the total PLFA content (a proxy for biomass), which decreased in the order of 0 cycles>5 cycles>8 cycles. Both the fluctuating zone (8-cycle and 5-cycle plots) and the never flooded zone (0-cycle plots) were dominated by Gram-positive bacteria and a low content of fungi, actinomycetes and protozoa. The fungi and protozoa abundance decreased significantly with an increase in the occurrence of flooding-dry down events, suggesting that the prolonged redox disturbance leads to high stress on the fungi and protozoa populations. Moreover, total organic matter (TOC) and C:N ratio, environmental factors that can be influenced by recurring redox fluctuations, also influenced the microbial community structure.

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Cite this article: Shuling Wang, Sarwee J. Faeflen, Alan L. Wright, Xia Zhu-Barker, Xianjun Jiang.       Redox-driven shifts in soil microbial community structure in the drawdown zone after construction of the Three Gorges Dam[J]. Soil Ecology Letters, 2019, 1(3-4): 114 -125


AOA and AOB communities respond differently to changes of soil pH under long-term fertilization

                                                    

DOI: 10.1007/s42832-019-0016-8

Ruibo Sun, David D. Myrold, Daozhong Wang, Xisheng Guo, Haiyan Chu

Abstract: Archaeal and bacterial ammonia-oxidizers drive the first step of nitrification, ammonia oxidation. Despite their importance, the relative contribution of soil factors influencing the abundance, diversity and community composition of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) are seldom compared. In this study, the AOA and AOB communities in soils from a long-term fertilization experiment (which formed gradients of pH and nutrients) were measured using 454 pyrosequencing of the amoA gene. Results showed that both AOA and AOB communities were influenced by fertilization practice. Changes of AOA abundance, diversity and community structure were closely correlated with a single factor, soil pH, and the abundance and diversity of AOA were lower under the acidified treatments. By contrast, AOB abundance was higher in the acidified soil than in the control soil while AOB diversity was little impacted by soil acidification, and both the abundance and diversity of AOB were most highly correlated with soil carbon and available phosphorus. These results indicated that AOB diversity seemed more resistant to soil acidification than that of AOA, and also suggested that AOB have greater ecophysiological diversity and broader range of habitats than AOA in this lime concretion black soil, and the potential contribution of AOB to ammonia oxidation in acid environments should not be overlooked.

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Cite this article: Ruibo Sun, David D. Myrold, Daozhong Wang, Xisheng Guo, Haiyan Chu.                AOA and AOB communities respond differently to changes of soil pH under long-term fertilization[J]. Soil Ecology Letters, 2019, 1(3-4): 126 -135 


Community assemblage of free-living diazotrophs along the elevational gradient of Mount Gongga   

                                                  

DOI: 10.1007/s42832-019-0013-y

Yansu Wang, Chaonan Li, Zehao Shen, Junpeng Rui, Decai Jin, Jiabao Li, Xiangzhen Li

Abstract: Mountain systems are unique for studying the responses of species distribution and diversity to environmental changes along elevational gradients. It is well known that free-living diazotrophic microorganisms are important to nitrogen cycling in mountain systems. However, the elevational patterns of free-living diazotrophs and the underlying ecological processes in controlling their turnover along broader gradients are less well documented. Here, we investigated the pattern of diazotrophic diversity along the elevational gradient (1800 m–4100 m) in Mount Gongga of China. The results showed that the α-diversity of diazotrophs did not change with the elevation from 1800 m to 2800 m, but decreased at elevations above 3000 m. Such diversity pattern was driven mainly by soil total carbon, nitrogen, and plant richness. Various diazotrophic taxa showed differential abundance-elevation relationships. Ecological processes determining diazotrophic community assemblage shift along the elevations. Deterministic processes were relatively stronger at both low and high elevations, whereas stochastic processes were stronger at the middle elevation. This study also suggested a strong relationship among aboveground plants and diazotrophs, highlighting their potential interactions, even for free-living diazotrophs.

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Cite this article: Yansu Wang, Chaonan Li, Zehao Shen, Junpeng Rui, Decai Jin, Jiabao Li, Xiangzhen Li. Community assemblage of free-living diazotrophs along the elevational gradient of Mount Gongga[J]. Soil Ecology Letters, 2019, 1(3-4): 136 -146


Organic amendment effects on nematode distribution within aggregate fractions in agricultural soils    

                                                     

DOI: 10.1007/s42832-019-0010-1

Xiaoke Zhang, Xia Wu, Shixiu Zhang, Yuehua Xing, Wenju Liang

Abstract: To evaluate the effect of organic amendments on soil nematode community composition and diversity within aggregate fractions, a study was initiated in agricultural soils with four-year organic amendments. Soil samples were collected from the plow layer (0–20 cm) under three cornfield management scenarios: 1) conventional cropping (CK, corn straw removal and no organic manure application); 2) straw retention (SR, incorporation of chopped corn stalk); and 3) manure application (MA, chicken manure input). The soil samples were fractionated into four aggregate sizes, i.e.,>2 mm (large macroaggregates), 1–2 mm (macroaggregates), 0.25–1 mm (small macroaggregates), and<0.25 mm (microaggregates, silt and clay fractions). The composition and diversity of soil nematode communities were determined within each aggregate fraction. The results showed that both SR and MA treatments significantly increased the percentage of macroaggregates (>1 mm) and only MA treatment strongly increased the mean weight diameter compared to the CK (P<0.05). The abundance of total nematodes and four trophic groups were affected significantly by the aggregate fractions and their higher abundance occurred in the larger aggregates. The effects of aggregate size on most nematode genera were significant. Bacterivores in the small macroaggregates and microaggregates, and fungivores in the large macroaggregates were significantly different among treatments. The percentage of bacterivores increased after the application of organic materials, while that of fungivores decreased. It can be concluded that organic management significantly affects soil aggregation and soil characteristics within aggregates, and the aggregate size subsequently influences the distribution of nematode communities.

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Cite this article: Xiaoke Zhang, Xia Wu, Shixiu Zhang, Yuehua Xing, Wenju Liang.                   Organic amendment effects on nematode distribution within aggregate fractions in agricultural soils[J]. Soil Ecology Letters, 2019, 1(3-4): 147 -156 


Improved rhizoremediation for decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in E-waste contaminated soils     

                                                  

DOI: 10.1007/s42832-019-0007-9

Jiayin Feng, Xinquan Shen, Jian Chen, Jiachun Shi, Jianming Xu, Caixian Tang, Philip C. Brookes, Yan He

Abstract: An experiment was conducted to improve rhizoremediation for decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) contaminated soil from typical E-waste dismantling areas. Plants of ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) were cultivated in aged-contaminated (initial concentration of 346.3 μg BDE-209·kg1) and freshly-spiked (initial concentration of 3127 μg BDE-209·kg1) soils, coupling with the agricultural modification strategies of compost addition and/or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) infection, respectively. 60 days’ growth of ryegrass significantly facilitated the dissipation of BDE-209, with the most effective in its rhizosphere in treatment inoculated with AMF; the BDE-209 dissipation rates achieved 51.9% and 22.8% in rhizosphere, and 43.5% and 19.8% in non-rhizosphere, for aged-contaminated and freshly-spiked soils, respectively. 120 days’ growth of rice with simultaneous inoculation of AMF and addition of compost was the most effective in facilitating BDE-209 dissipation in aged-contaminated soil, with the removal rates of 53.3% and 48.1% in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils respectively; while for freshly-spiked soils, the most effective removal was achieved by compost addition only, with the BDE-209 dissipation rates of 27.9% and 26.6% in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils, respectively. High throughput sequencing analysis of rhizosphere soil DNA showed that responses in microbial communities and their structure differed with plant species, soil pollution dose, AMF inoculation and/or compost addition. Actinomycetales, Xanthomonadales, Burkholderiales, Sphingomonadales, Clostridiales, Cytophagales, Gemmatimonadales and Saprospirales were the sensitive responders and even possibly potential functional microbial groups during the facilitated removal of BDE-209 in soils. This study illustrates an effective rhizoremediation pattern for removal of BDE-209 in pollution soils, through successive cultivation of rice and followed by ryegrass, with rice growth coupled with AMF inoculation and compost addition, while ryegrass growth coupled with AMF inoculation only.

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Cite this article: Jiayin Feng, Xinquan Shen, Jian Chen, Jiachun Shi, Jianming Xu, Caixian Tang, Philip C. Brookes, Yan He.  Improved rhizoremediation for decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in E-waste contaminated soils[J]. Soil Ecology Letters, 2019, 1(3-4): 157 -173 





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