何毓琦的个人博客分享 http://blog.sciencenet.cn/u/何毓琦 哈佛(1961-2001) 清华(2001-date)

博文

"入境问俗(入乡随俗)” 还是 “同化人家” Chinese American in the US #2

已有 9110 次阅读 2007-9-7 03:40 |系统分类:海外观察

The English saying "When in Rome, do as the Romans do" can be faithfully translated into the 


Confucian saying of  "入境问俗" However, Chinese culture has such a strong identity that 


foreign influxes to China often end up adopting Chinese culture and melt into the population. 


Examples of this are the Jews of Kaifeng (开封) and more recently the Ching dynasty (满清). 


This tendency of trying to assimilate others (or refusal to adopt foreign customs) even gets 


carried onto foreign soils.  The term "?a华侨" clearly implies that "I am a Chinese who is 


temporarily here in this foreign country". However, seriously speaking, how many of the 


millions of Chinese-Americans currently living in the US will ever return to live in China?. Part 


of the reason for the existence of "Chinatowns" (and by the same token the absence of "French 


towns" or "India towns") is this refusal to follow the custom of others while living in a foreign 


land. In mixed gatherings, some Chinese American pointedly will converse in Chinese only 


totally ignoring the local Americans present. The extreme example of this is the fact that in 


certain California town, signs, menus, and displays in stores are only available in Chinese. 


Imagine the antagonistic feelings thus generated in the minds of the locals. 


As a result, Chinese-Americans, compare to other racial groups are by and large not mainstream 


in the US. Japanese Americans, far smaller in number, have elected several senators, 


congressman, and state governors. Korean and Indian American politicians have also achieved 


national status before the Chinese. I may be wrong but currently there is only one elected 


congressman (David Woo of Oregon) who is ethnically Chinese on the national scene.


Ignorance or "refusal to assimilate" also has other unfortunate implications. Some Chinese 


customs are 180 degree different from western ones. Ignorance of such can lead to 


misunderstandings and bad feelings. One example is "invitation and RSVPs". Formal invitations, 


such as dinner or weddings, often carry the message of RSVP which means "please reply your 


acceptance or declination". But many Chinese Americans still follow the Chinese custom – “我有空就来”-  and ignore the request. Also, in the US, invitations for dinner are very specific as to 


who are invited or not invited (e.g. children). The custom of“加一双筷子殳有关系" does not 


operate in western countries since cost of a dinner is counted on per seating or per head basis. 


Disregard of this fact can lead to embarrassment both for the host and the guest. Another 


example is to "drop in on your friends without prior notice". In China, it is often considered rude 


to announce to your friend that one plans to visit and to make an appointment in the sense of  “不要警动主人" (this may be a leftover habit form the olden days when telephones are not 


prevalent). But the western custom is exactly the opposite.


Chinese culture also are very strong with respect to "family obligations" but weak in "social 


responsibilities" 请看周可真教授傅客:8/19/07假货与政治). The operating p hilosophy seems 


to be "mind your own business" or “各埽自已门前雪莫管他人瓦上霜. Sure, the label of 


"model minority" often applied to Chinese Americans may mean we are law abiding. But we 


also have the reputation of "aloofness" and "not public minded". Volunteering for public service 


is not a strong suit among Chinese Americans. Yet many are very quick to take advantage of 


public goods and welfare but not realizing that you have to "give" as well as "take". Yes, during 


periods of uncertainty such as war or the Cultural Revolution when you don't know what 


tomorrow may bring, a survival strategy is to "grab when and what you can". In a more stable 


society, life is a two way street. Public service and volunteering are a very honorable things to do 


in a neighborhood or in the town you live in. In the Sixties, there was a best seller titled "the 


Ugly Americans" which chronicles the boorish behaviors of some Americans abroad. The 


Taiwanese author 柏杨??, I believe, wrote in the 80s a book titled "The Ugly Chinese" in a similar 


vein. There are much truths in that book. (I thank reader[3] below for providing the Chinese name of the Taiwanese author)





When things do not go their way, many Chinese immigrants are the first to cry "racial 


discrimination".  Yes, discrimination still exists in the US. But she is the most open and tolerant 


country I know. "Responsibilities and Privileges" go together. To enjoy the freedom and 


privileges in the US also means to accept certain "public responsibilities". As a group when 


compared to others, we seem to be deficient in this respect and not as "mainstream".  I don't 


know how long it will take the native born generations of Chinese Americans to shed this image 


and reality. 





One of my friend said it well. America is often called "the melting pot". But a more apt metaphor 


can be " a delicious stew" in which each ethnic group can still maintain their cultural 


distinctiveness but at the same time contribute to harmonious function of the society by 


participating in full.

http://blog.sciencenet.cn/blog-1565-6971.html

上一篇:科技创新与同行评价
下一篇:Iraq through Chinese lens

0

发表评论 评论 (5 个评论)

数据加载中...
扫一扫,分享此博文

Archiver|手机版|科学网 ( 京ICP备07017567号-12 )

GMT+8, 2020-11-1 04:16

Powered by ScienceNet.cn

Copyright © 2007- 中国科学报社

返回顶部